Athletes claim it gives energy, enhances post-workout recovery and stops joint pain. Moms praise its immunity-boosting effects for keeping families healthy. And, the medical community is starting to take notice of kombucha, the most effective probiotic.

How does this fizzy drink positively benefit your health?

Kombucha, the Most Effective Probiotic

A living colony of yeast and bacteria, or SCOBY, ferments tea into kombucha. While it may not sound pleasant, this powerhouse of organic acids, enzymes and probiotics enhances good gut bacteria (a.k.a. probiotics). Your body needs probiotics and kombucha delivers them.

This popular drink:

  • Promotes healthy digestion
  • Soothes upset stomachs and IBS
  • Remedies constipation, diarrhea, bloating and cramping
  • Increases metabolism and enhances weight loss
  • Strengthens the immune system

Good gut bacteria decreases with antibiotic and alcohol use, and stress. Kombucha replaces it for enhanced gut health. And, this means general good health for you, since the bacteria in your gut stimulate your immune system.

Kombucha, a Source of B Vitamins and More

The vitamin and mineral-packed kombucha supplies nutrients to your body more effectively than supplements. A host of B vitamins, iron and Vitamin C from raw, active kombucha absorb more readily than those in pill form. As a result, this drink:

  • Gives you an energy boost (without the annoying caffeine crash)
  • Evens out your mood
  • Helps you focus

Kombucha fills the vitamin and mineral gap found in our diets. Its pre- and probiotics further enhance the absorption of the good stuff. Electrolytes, like potassium, also replenish the body after a workout or a long day of yard work.

Kombucha, a Provider of Antioxidants

Antioxidants boost the immune system, prevent cell damage, promote fat loss, support healthy weight and fight cancer. And, kombucha boasts plenty of them. Medical professionals continue to report that food-sourced antioxidants are better than supplements.

In fact, supplements may cause more harm than good. The risk of drinking kombucha? Not paying attention to what you are consuming. Over-fermentation from home brewing or contamination issues raise cautions. However, properly made, the antioxidant-rich drink does your body good.

Kombucha, a Formidable Enemy to Bacteria

The fermentation process produces acetic acid and other antimicrobials. Abundant in kombucha, acetic acid kills harmful microbes. Staph and salmonella are among the bacteria tested against kombucha. E.coli and staph prove no match for its antimicrobial powers.

Furthermore, versions made with green tea include polyphenols. These compounds have strong antibacterial properties. Polyphenols in kombucha eliminate infection-causing bacteria and yeasts. All good news for your health.

 

Stay tuned for Part 2 where we discuss the qualities of kombucha that help your body fight disease…

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